fbpx
69.7 F
Spokane
Monday, May 27, 2024
HomeNewsNational NewsU.S. Supreme Court Allows Idaho to Enforce Gender Care Ban While Lawsuit...

U.S. Supreme Court Allows Idaho to Enforce Gender Care Ban While Lawsuit Plays Out

Date:

Related stories

Spokane library hosts Taiko drumming event for AAPI Heritage Month

Experience the mesmerizing beats of Spokane Taiko drum group during Asian American & Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Heritage Month.

Should Memorial Day be observed in church?

Examining the role of Memorial Day in evangelical churches. Explore the controversy surrounding its observance in sanctuaries.

Spokane rallies to restore defaced Pride crosswalk, raises $15,000 in three days

Discover how the Spokane Arts non-profit raised $15,000 in just three days to repaint the Pride crosswalk mural.

New report finds ‘surge’ in corporate attention to religious diversity

Explore the changing landscape of corporate diversity. Learn how more Fortune 500 companies are embracing religious diversity and inclusion.

FāVS Religion News Roundup: May 24

Get the latest religion news about the Spokane Tribe children chosen as Pow-Wow head staff, antisemitism in city council meetings, Spokane chaplains and more.

Our Sponsors

spot_img
spot_img

U.S. Supreme Court Allows Idaho to Enforce Gender Care Ban While Lawsuit Plays Out

SCOTUS sides with state to allow enforcement of gender-affirming care ban for youth. Poe v. Labrador lawsuit remains ongoing.

News Story by Mia Maldonado | Idaho Capital Sun

The U.S. Supreme Court has allowed Idaho to enforce House Bill 71, a law banning Idaho youth from receiving gender-affirming care medications and surgeries.

In an opinion issued Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court granted the state of Idaho’s request to stay the preliminary injunction, which blocked the law from taking effect. This means the preliminary injunction now only applies to the plaintiffs involved in Poe v. Labrador — a lawsuit brought on by the families of two transgender teens in Idaho who seek gender-affirming care. 

Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision enforces the gender-affirming care ban for all other transgender youth in Idaho as the lawsuit remains ongoing in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Raul Labrador
Idaho Attorney General candidate Raul Labrador gives a speech at the Idaho GOP election night watch party at the Grove in Boise, Idaho on November 8, 2022. / Photo by Otto Kitsinger (Idaho Capital Sun)

The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of Idaho, both of whom represent the plaintiffs, said in a press release Monday that the ruling “does not touch upon the constitutionality” of House Bill 71. The groups called Monday’s ruling an “awful result” for transgender Idaho youth and their families.

“Today’s ruling allows the state to shut down the care that thousands of families rely on while sowing further confusion and disruption,” the organizations said in the press release. “Nonetheless, today’s result only leaves us all the more determined to defeat this law in the courts entirely, making Idaho a safer state to raise every family.”

Idaho Attorney General Raúl Labrador in a press release said the state has a duty to protect and support all children, and that he is proud of the state’s legal stance. 

“Those suffering from gender dysphoria deserve love, support and medical care rooted in biological reality,” Labrador said. “Denying the basic truth that boys and girls are biologically different hurts our kids. No one has the right to harm children, and I’m grateful that we, as the state, have the power — and duty — to protect them.”

Recap of Idaho’s House Bill 71, and what led to SCOTUS opinion

Monday’s Supreme Court decision traces back to when House Bill 71 was signed into law in April 2023.

The law makes it a felony punishable for up to 10 years for doctors to provide surgeries, puberty-blockers and hormones to transgender people under the age of 18. However, gender-affirming surgeries are not and were not performed among Idaho adults or youth before the bill was signed into law, the Idaho Capital Sun previously reported

One month after it was signed into law, the families of two transgender teens sued the state in a lawsuit alleging the bill violates the 14th Amendment’s guarantee of equal protection under the law.

In late December, just days before the law was set to take effect in the New Year, District of Idaho Judge B. Lynn Winmill blocked the law from taking effect under a preliminary injunction. In his decision, he said he found the families likely to succeed in their challenge.

The state of Idaho responded by appealing the district court’s preliminary injunction decision to the Ninth Circuit, to which the Ninth Circuit denied. The state of Idaho argued the court should at least enforce the ban for everyone except for the plaintiffs. 

After the Ninth Circuit’s denial, the Idaho Attorney General’s Office in February sent an emergency motion to the U.S. Supreme Court, the Idaho Press reported. Monday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision agrees with the state’s request to enforce its ban on transgender health care for minors, except for the two plaintiffs.

Idaho Capital Sun
Idaho Capital Sunhttps://idahocapitalsun.com/
The Idaho Capital Sun is the Gem State’s newest nonprofit news organization delivering accountability journalism on state politics, health care, tax policy, the environment and more. They are part of States Newsroom, the nation’s largest state-focused nonprofit news organization.

Our Sponsors

spot_img
spot_img
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x