fbpx
33.5 F
Spokane
Saturday, March 2, 2024
HomeCommentaryTotalitarianism and Its Roots in Hate and Fear

Totalitarianism and Its Roots in Hate and Fear

Date:

Related stories

How Alabama Supreme Court’s Ruling on Life Affects IVF

In vitro fertilization (IVF) fertility treatments are on pause in Alabama due to the perceived fear of prosecution and lawsuits in light of the Alabama Supreme Court’s ruling on Friday, Feb. 16, stating that human beings frozen in the embryonic stage have the same legal rights and protections as children who are born.

Ask a Hindu: Why Do You Not Believe in a God?

Why, as a Hindu, do you not believe in a God and everything in the universe indicates his existence?

For Lent Let’s Give Up Negativity and Replace It with Positive Action

Attitudes about Lent have changed over the decades. Instead of “giving up” something for Lent, the approach is more about growing closer to Christ in more meaningful ways.

From the Wilderness into New Life: Everyone Can Participate in Lent

Lent thus offers a cluster of possibilities: fasting — or at least giving up something for Lent; repenting; joining Jesus in a wilderness experience; and experiencing the lengthening of days. Can everyone take part?

Black History Month for White People: Racism Is Our Problem

FāVS columnist Sarah Henn Hayward explores how racism in America is a White problem and what White Americans can do about it this Black History month.

Totalitarianism and Its Roots in Hate and Fear

Guest Column by Ernesto Tinajero

In Hannah Arendt’s “Origins of Totalitarianism,” she looks at the rise of totalitarianism and its effects on humanity. In our contemporary discourse, we have returned to her analysis as we see the darkness of authoritarianism rise. She argues that the root of totalitarianism is hatred and fear, as it seeks to eliminate the other to maintain total control.

By looking at the historical rise of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, Arendt argues that the ultimate result of this form of government was the dehumanization of one group who is stripped of their human rights.

In time, all humans in the system will be stripped of their humanity. When we treat others as nothing more than objects to be used for the dominant group’s own purpose, then this dehumanization leads to the killing of innocent people.

The story of Cain and Abel, as I have posted before, as well as Arendt’s analysis of the origin of totalitarianism, serve as a reminder of the power of hate and its potential to lead to violence and death.

The story is about two brothers, Cain and Abel, whose parents, Adam and Eve, had been exiled from the Garden of Eden. In this story, Cain and Abel make a sacrifice to God, but God prefers Abel’s sacrifice over Cain’s. This causes Cain to become filled with jealousy and hate, and he ends up killing Abel in a cold blood.

The power of hate leads to the death of the innocent. As the story of Cain and Abel shows us, unchecked hatred has devastating consequences, and we have to make sure such violence does not devour us.

Hannah Arendt’s analysis in her book can be applied to our modern world, as we continue to see the devastating effects of hate. In our current era, we are witnessing the resurgence of white supremacy, racism and xenophobia, all of which are fueled by hatred and intolerance of those who are different from us.

This hatred can manifest in violence, as we have seen in the recent shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio. These tragedies are a stark reminder of the potential for unchecked hatred to lead to violence and death.

If we are to prevent such tragedies from occurring, we must be willing to confront our own capacity for hatred and remember the words of Jesus to love our enemies. If we strive to create a society that is based on tolerance and acceptance, we must take the door Jesus gives out of our madness of hate. We must also recognize that unchecked hatred is a destructive force that can lead to the destruction of our fellow humans.

Hannah Arendt’s analysis of the origin of totalitarianism can be applied to our modern world, as we continue to see the devastating effects of hate. In our current era, we are witnessing the resurgence of white supremacy, racism, and xenophobia, all of which are fueled by hatred and intolerance of those who are different from us.

This hatred can manifest in violence, as we have seen in the recent shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio. These tragedies are a stark reminder of the potential for unchecked hatred to lead to violence and death.

It is important to remember that hate is a destructive force and should not be taken lightly. Hate can lead to the death of our fellow humans and can have devastating consequences. We must learn from both Arendt’s “Origins of Totalitarianism” and the biblical story of Cain and Abel and strive to combat hate in all its forms.

We must remember that we are all part of one human race and that we should treat each other with respect and understanding. Only then, can we hope to prevent hate from leading to the death of our fellow humans.

Here is the poem based on this post.

Ernesto Tinajero
Ernesto Tinajero
Art, says Ernesto Tinajero, comes from the border of what has come before and what is coming next. Tinajero uses his experience studying poetry and theology to write about the intersecting borders of art, poetry and religion.

Ad

spot_img
spot_img
spot_img
spot_img
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
spot_img
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x