fbpx
69 F
Spokane
Saturday, April 13, 2024
spot_img
HomeCommentaryAsk An Eastern Orthodox Christian: Will God Forgive the Blasphemy of the...

Ask An Eastern Orthodox Christian: Will God Forgive the Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit?

Date:

Related stories

Contradictions and Consistency in the Bible: Part One

I do not believe there are any significant contradictions in the Bible. I believe the entire text is “God-breathed.” (2 Timothy 3:16) God is perfectly powerful to have guided the evolution of his holy book.

Indifference Makes a Difference

Columnist Paul Graves encourages us to care in this column. To. Give. A. Damn. Or GAD. Because every person has value as a human being.

What Would a Country Run by White Christian Nationalists Look Like?

A few years ago, many of us might not have considered white Christian nationalism as a viable existential threat to American democracy. Not so now. And for all intents and purposes it is going to be on the ballot this November.

An Oklahoma Easter Filled with Microaggressions, Judgmentalism and, Yes, Even Hope

I knew that moving from Spokane to rural Oklahoma was going to be very different culturally and politically. I wasn't deluded into thinking that it would be even close to the same, because I know better.

No Eid for You in Gaza.

Every year Ramadan and Eid returns, so does the suffering of the people of Palestine return. The people of Gaza have been amidst famine throughout the holiest month of Ramadan. Meanwhile I and many fellow Muslims around the globe will be celebrating the end of Ramadan with gifts, families, friends and feasts.

Our Sponsors

spot_img
spot_img

Ask An Eastern Orthodox Christian: Will God Forgive the Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit?

What would you like to know about the Eastern Orthodox Christian faith? Submit your question.

By Nicholas Damascus

The blasphemy of the Holy Spirit occurs when a person actively pursues a conscious, continuous deliberate malicious attitude of rejecting the Holy Spirit of God, calling God who is good, evil. This sin is unforgivable as long as that person continues in this intentional continuous declarative state, leaving no hope of salvation in this life or the next. 

Many Christian fathers, including St. John Chrysostom, said that blasphemy against the Holy Spirit “would be forgiven to those who sincerely repent.” They go on to say that there are no unforgivable sins if a blasphemer turns towards God with a truly contrite spirit and genuinely repents of this sin. 

Spiritually dead

We are a spiritual being existing in a carnal body. We are also the temple of the Holy Spirit (1Cor 6:19). It is God the Holy Spirit that brings God the Father and God the Son to dwell within you. John 14:16 states that God is life itself. If God, the “life source,” does not dwell within a person’s temple, they are spiritually dead (1Cor 13:1-3). 

Christ’s first and major message to be saved was in Matthew 3:2, “Repent for the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand.” God forgives and does not condemn the repentant sinner. However, true repentance includes striving to sin no more. 

God’s unconditional love for us never changes no matter what we have done, what we are doing, and what we will do. There is nothing that anyone can do to change His love for every one of us.   

Access to the Kingdom

The presence of the Holy Spirit of God within us enables one to gain access to the Kingdom of God. It is there that one experiences the fruit of the spirit; unconditional love, joy that is eternal, peace beyond understanding, patience beyond our capability, kindness that bathes those around us, goodness that edifies the heart, faithfulness that gives hope, gentleness that is comforting, and self-control that comes from His strength.” (Galatians 5:22). 

Although fasting, prayer, and almsgiving are all well and good, the primary aim of every Christian should be “the acquisition of the Holy Spirit of God” by providing the environment where He may intimately dwell within us. 

https://form.jotform.com/form/82767011384155
Nicholas Damascus
Nicholas Damascus
As an infant, I was baptized as an Eastern Orthodox Christian. However, I would say that becoming a Christian is a work in progress, and I often wonder would there be enough evidence to convict me of becoming a Christian. The Orthodox Church is the ancient Church that Christ and the Apostles established. It is not a religion but rather a way of life. It is not about rules and regulations but rather guide posts to make choices to transition to what we were designed to become. Becoming Orthodox is not a conversion but more so a transformation of self. It’s not about being right: it is about “right being.” In John 14:6, Christ says I am the Way (to love and serve one another), the Truth (there is only one reality), and the Life (that life source is love). I invite you to submit any topics or questions to “Ask An Eastern Orthodox Christian” on the website. Join me in finding our way back home to the original teachings of the Church. When you change the way you look at things, things change the way they look.

Our Sponsors

spot_img
spot_img
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x